Category Archives: Kidney

Blood in Your Urine

If you notice blood in your urine (which is called hematuria), you should consult your doctor.  Although in some cases blood in your urine is not serious, it can also be a sign of a medical problem.  It is difficult to tell if the blood in your urine is harmless or if it is a sign of a disease, but your doctor can order tests to figure out what is causing it.

If your doctor determines that the blood in your urine has been caused by a medical condition, you will likely be given a treatment to resolve the root cause of the problem.  Once the problem is gone, the blood in your urine should be, too.  There isn’t really a specific treatment for bloody urine itself.  It is usually treated as part of a wider problem.

There are several likely places where the blood in your urine may have come from.  The bladder, kidneys, ureters (which connect the kidneys and bladder) or the urethra (which carries urine out of the body from the bladder) are all possibilities.  It is also possible that the blood came from somewhere else entirely, such as a cut in the skin that is bleeding or the vagina.

What Conditions Are Associated with Blood in Urine?

You can sometimes see blood in your urine- this will turn it an abnormal color, such as red, brownish red, pink or the color of tea.  However, on some occasions the blood isn’t visible and you find out about it because it was found in a urine sample you gave. 

If you are female, it is possible that the blood in your urine is related to menstruation.  For a short period of time after a period, lab tests may find red blood cells in your urine sample. 
If you have blood in your urine in addition to other symptoms, the likelihood that a medical condition is causing it is higher.  The following are possible causes of blood in urine:
• Kidney or bladder stones (urinary stones). Other symptoms you may experience include severe pain in the pelvic area or abdominal pain.

• Kidney infection. This is also known as pyelonephritis. Symptoms include lower back pain, fever and chills.

• Bladder or urinary tract infections (UTI). Symptoms of UTIs vary, but commonly include frequent urge to urinate and pain during urination. Babies that have urinary tract infections may run a fever, lose interest in eating and display signs of irritability.

• Enlarged prostate or prostate cancer. Early stage prostate cancer may not have any symptoms. Later, symptoms such as difficulty urinating, swelling in the legs, discomfort in the pelvic area and bone pain may be present.

• Sickle cell anemia. This disease is present at birth, but symptoms may not show until a few months later. Symptoms can be extreme and life-threatening. They include restriction of blood flow to organs or extremities, pain and many other serious symptoms. 

• Cystic kidney diseases. There are dozens of different types of cystic kidney diseases. All involve cysts on the kidneys. Some become apparent early in life, while others show up after age 50.

• Glomerulonephritis.  This is an inflammation in the kidneys. 

• Tumors in the urinary tract or prostate.

• Injury to the kidneys.

• Extremely vigorous exercise.

•Some medications, such as penicillin, heparin, phenazopyridine, cyclophosphamide and aspirin.

Foods & Dyes Can Make Urine Look Like It Has Blood In It

Some food dyes can turn your urine red or orange, which might look like your urine has blood in it.  Sometimes people will not realize they have ingested food dyes.  This is often the case when they take a product like AZO, an over-the-counter medication for urinary pain.  The change in urine color caused by food dyes is harmless and will go away once you stop ingesting the dye.

If you eat a lot of beets, it can turn your urine red.

Reasons You May Have Blood in Your Urine

There are many medical conditions that can make your urine bloody, and you need to know what they are if you’re seeing red in the toilet:

• UTI Infection
• Kidney Stones
• Bladder Stones
• Trauma
• Clotting
• Medications
• Cancer

Blood in urine is related to all of these conditions. If you’re seeing red when you should be seeing yellow, call your physician and schedule an appointment.  Don’t assume hematuria will go away on its own, especially if you are a bit older.

To find out the cause of your bloody urine for sure, you’ll have to see your doctor. Without the appropriate tests, it is difficult to tell what might be causing the problem.

If you’ve recently experienced any type of trauma, perhaps from a car accident or sports injury, you may very well have bloody urine for that reason.

Seniors especially should pay attention to any blood in their urine.  Men who are over the age of 50 should always get regular prostate checks to ensure prostate health.

Related:

Urinary Tract Infections

Cloudy Urine

Red Urine

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Red Urine

 

red urineUrine that appears red in color could be a sign of a serious health problem.

There are many reasons your urine might turn red. Foods known to make your urine red or pink include blackberries, rhubarb and beets. This is due to the fact that these foods contain anthocyanins. If the cause of your red urine is the foods you’ve eaten, the unusual color will go away in a day or two. It is harmless.

 Medications that Cause Red Urine
Certain medications can turn your urine red. If you’ve just started a new medication, check with your doctor or pharmacist to see if red urine is a side effect of your medication. Some medications known to cause red urine are:

  • Rifampin– an anti-biotic
  • Pyridium (phenazopyridine)- often an ingredient in medications for relief of urinary pain
  • Senna– sometimes an ingredient in laxatives
  • Compazine– an anti-nausea medication
  • Coumadin (warfarin)- a blood thinner
  • Aspirin– a common pain reliever
  • Phenytoin (Dilantin)- an anti-seizure medication
  • Quinine (Quinerva, Quinite)- an anti-malaria drug that is also a component of tonic water and bitter lemon
  • Some tranquilizers and laxatives can turn urine a reddish color.

More Causes of Red Urine
The most common causes of red urine (if not caused by diet or medications) are urinary tract infections (UTIs) and kidney stones.

Blood in urine can make it look red. If you have blood in your urine, there are several possible causes. See our page on Blood In Urine for more information.

Although they are not the most common causes, kidney disease or a tumor in the urinary tract can cause red urine.

Another rare cause can be Sickle Cell Anemia.

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Dark Urine

Dark Colored Urine

Dark Colored Urine

What Is Normal Urine Supposed To Look Like?
The normal urine of a healthy person should be a light yellow color. It should be clear, not cloudy.  And its odor should not be very strong.

What Causes Dark Colored Urine?
There are many possible situations that could make your urine dark. Some of these are no cause for concern, but others are signs of serious illness.

There are different types of dark urine. If you have blood in your urine, the color may be red, orange, pink, brownish-red or the color of tea.

A urinary tract infection (UTI or bladder infection) can make your urine darker and/or cloudy.

Ordinary, everyday substances sometimes make your urine darker than normal. Examples include beets, blackberries, B complex vitamins, beta carotene and food colorings.

Dehydration Causes Dark Yellow Urine
Urine that is dark yellow in color is very often caused by dehydration. When you drink less water, your urine becomes more concentrated and it will appear darker. Make sure your water intake is adequate. Eight glasses a day is a common recommendation, but you may need to drink more in certain situations, such as the following:

  • Extreme weather temperatures, both hot and cold;
  • Exercise increases your need for water;
  • Sweating;
  • Your height and weight.

As you drink more water, you should notice the color of your urine getting lighter and lighter.

Foods and Medications that Can Turn Your Pee Dark Yellow
The foods you eat can make your urine dark yellow. Food coloring, dyes and even compounds found in natural, unprocessed food could make your pee darker temporarily. Sometimes you will even find these dyes or colorings in medications. Some foods known to cause a change in the color of your urine include:

  • Blackberries
  • Asparagus
  • Beets
  • Fava Beans
  • Aloe

If you have taken certain medications recently, they could be the cause of dark yellow urine color:

  • Laxatives
  • Warfarin
  • Rifampin
  • Phenazopyridine
  • Nitrofurantoin
  • Quinine and related drugs
  • Sulfamethoxazole

Diseases and Medical Conditions that Cause Dark Yellow Urine
If you are having other symptoms in addition to dark yellow urine, such as foul smelling urine, fever or pain, you should see your doctor for a diagnosis. It is quite possible your symptoms are related and may be part of a larger problem.

Urinary Tract Infections
One common medical condition that causes dark yellow urine is a urinary tract infection (UTI). If you have a UTI, chances are your urine looks cloudy or has a foul odor, and you could have other typical symptoms:

  • Frequent urge to urinate
  • Painful urination
  • Pain in your back under one of your ribs
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Nausea and/or vomiting

If you have a compromised immune system or any of the conditions below, you are at a higher risk for having UTIs:

  • Diabetes
  • Kidney Disease or kidney stones
  • Pregnant
  • Have an enlarged prostate

Dark Colored Urine

There are also medications that will make your urine dark, such as pyridium. An example of an over-the-counter medication that changes urine color is AZO, which relieves urinary pain.

Liver diseases may cause dark urine. Jaundice, known for its tendency to turn skin yellow, is a sign associated with liver dysfunction. Hepatitis A, B and C may cause dark colored urine, but they are not the only liver conditions that may do this.

Gallstones may cause urine color to become darker. Other symptoms they cause include loss of appetite, indigestion and jaundice.

Overheating/over exposure to heat causes urine to become dark. If you suspect someone is overheating, seek medical attention immediately. If not treated, this condition can kill a person. Some other signs of overheating are clammy skin, hyperventilation (fast breathing) and excessive sweating.

Dark Urine

If you or a loved one is experiencing dark urine, it could be cause for alarm, but most likely it is nothing to get worried about.  Your urine is normally clear with a faint yellow color.  The color of your urine may change, however, based on the types of foods you’re eating, the liquids you’re drinking, and the medications you’re taking.  Some substances and compounds can alter the color of our urine, sometimes leading to dark urine.

What Causes Dark Urine?

Some of the things that can lead to dark urine are natural or artificial food colors, which may come from foods like dark colored berries or beets.  Even something as mundane as black licorice, (which also makes your stool turn green, by the way) can give you a dark urine color.  Alcoholic drinks can also darken the color of your urine, so if you are drinking a lot, consider cutting back.  Another good idea is to increase your water intake- whether or not you continue drinking alcohol, making this simple change can do wonders for the health of your urinary tract and liver.

If you take vitamins or laxatives, you may notice a change in the color of your urine, making it look darker.  Pyridium, a substance commonly found in laxatives, is one drug that will often make your urine a darker color.  If you’re taking a carotene supplement, which is a form of Vitamin A, or if you just have higher levels of carotene from eating foods such as broccoli, spinach, or other fruits and vegetables high in carotene, your urine could darken as a result.  This is usually no cause for concern.

Another possible cause of dark urine is blood.  Many things can cause blood to appear in your urine, including infections, kidney disease, kidney stones, severe bodily trauma, and even cancer.  If you’re suffering from a urinary tract infection, your urine may appear darker in color.  Jaundice, which is yellowing of the skin, is another cause of dark urine because of the increased levels of bilirubin in the bloodstream.  Liver disease or other obstructions that interfere with bile, such as diseases of the pancreas or bile ducts, are sometimes to blame for dark colored urine.

The most common cause of dark urine, however, is dehydration.  If you’re not drinking enough water your urine will be more concentrated, leading to urine that is darker than normal.

When to Seek Medical Attention

If you’ve experienced any pain when you urinate and/or your urine is a dark color, you could have a medical condition that needs attention.  Fever and fatigue are also warning  signs that should make you seek a doctor’s advice. and if your dark urine is accompanied by any of these symptoms, schedule an appointment with your doctor immediately.  A dark brown color, for instance, could mean you’re suffering from a serious liver ailment, possibly even cirrhosis or hepatitis.  When dark urine shows up with other symptoms, prompt medical attention is your best course of action.

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StinkyUrine.com: All Topics

Colors of Urine Main Page
Black Urine
Blood in Urine
Blue Urine
Brown Urine
Cloudy Urine
Cloudy, White Urine
Dark Urine
Green Urine
Orange Urine……………………..Dark or Light
Pink Urine
Purple Urine
Red Urine
Yellow Urine……………………..Neon or Dark

Urifresh2

Urifresh Capsules Get Rid of Stinky Urine

 

 

 

Diabetes & Stinky Urine
Diabetes Main Page
Diabetes
Ketoacidosis

 

Genetic Disorders that Can Cause Foul Smelling Urine
Genetic Disorders Main Page
Glycogen Storage Diseases
Maple Syrup Urine Disease
Phenylketonuria
Renal Glycosuria

 

Substances that Cause Stinky Urine
Habits and Substances Main Page
Dehydration
Foods, Drinks and Spices
High Protein, Low-Carb Diets
Medications
Smoking
Vitamins and Supplements

 

Infections that May Make Your Urine Smell Bad
Infections Main Page
Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs)
Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs)
Yeast Infections

 

Ketonuria & Ketones-Related Causes of Stinky Urine
Ketonuria Main Page
Eating Disorders
Extreme Stress or Illness
Fasting
Glycogen Storage Disease
High Protein, Low-Carb Diets
Hyperthyroidism
Pregnancy and Lactation
Renal Glycosuria
Repeated Vomiting
Starvation

 

Kidney, Bladder and Liver Conditions that Cause Smelly Urine
Kidney, Bladder and Liver Conditions Main Page
Bladder Cancer
Fistula
Kidney Stones
Liver Failure
Renal Glycosuria
Vesicoureteral Reflux

 

Top 10 Causes of Stinky Urine
Asparagus
Dehydration
High Protein, Low-Carb Diets
Kidney Stones
Medications
Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs)
Smoking
Urinary Tract Infections (UTI)
Vitamins and Supplements
Yeast Infections

 

Worst Case Scenarios
Worst Case Scenarios Main Page
Bladder Cancer
Diabetes
Fistula
Glycogen Storage Disease
Ketoacidosis
Liver Failure
Maple Syrup Urine Disease
Phenylketonuria

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Cloudy Urine

cloudy urineMost of the time, urine is pale yellow and transparent. It is not necessarily abnormal to have cloudy urine, though. There are both harmless and dangerous possible causes of it.

One cause that is harmless is when you have a buildup of phosphates in your urine. This will make it appear cloudy instead of clear. This can occur due to the foods you ate. Your urine should return to normal within a day or two.

 

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) can cause cloudy urine. Usually, a UTI will have other symptoms, like frequent urination, urinary pain or a constant urge to urinate. It is possible, though, for a UTI to have no other symptoms. The only way to find out if you have a UTI is to consult with a doctor and have your urine tested.

 

What Causes Cloudy Urine?

Cloudy urine can come from excessive protein in the urine. This is called proteinuria.  It can be caused by high blood pressure, kidney diseases and in pregnant women, it may be a sign of pre-eclampsia.

In men, inflammation of the prostate (prostatitis) can cause cloudy urine. It usually also causes more noticeable symptoms, such as pain, fever and chills. If you suspect you have prostatitis, you should see a doctor.

 

 

What Causes Cloudy Urine During Pregnancy?

Cloudy urine during pregnancy can have many causes. It is important to let your doctor know if you are having cloudy urine during pregnancy, as the it could be a sign of pre-eclampsia.

Cloudy urine during pregnancy can also come from excessive protein in the urine (proteinuria). It can be caused by high blood pressure, kidney disease and urinary tract infections. Many people experience cloudy urine at times, but if you have cloudy urine during pregnancy, you should discuss it with your doctor just to be sure it is not serious.

 

Some sexually transmitted diseases may cause your urine to look cloudy. Gonorrhea in particular is known for causing this.

Pus or vaginal discharge in urine can make it look cloudy.

CLICK HERE for information on urine that is cloudy and white.

 

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Cloudy, White Urine

If you have white, cloudy urine, there are many possible causes. Mild dehydration can cause white, cloudy urine.  Usually, if your white, cloudy urine is due to dehydration, you will have no other symptoms and it should resolve within a day. Be sure you are drinking enough water. If your urine is still white and cloudy after a day, your problem is probably not dehydration and you should see your doctor.

Cloudy, White Urine

Infections Can Cause White, Cloudy Urine

Infections, especially in the urinary tract, cause white, cloudy urine. The color comes from the white blood cells your body uses to fight off the infection.

Even if you have no other symptoms, you can still have a urinary tract infection. Cloudy, white urine caused by infections is often accompanied by:

  • Abdominal pain or discomfort

  • Flank pain

  • Frequent urination

  • Pain or burning sensation when urinating

  • Fever

  • Nausea

If your cloudy, white urine lasts more than a day or you have other symptoms, see your doctor to be tested for a urinary tract infection.

Both women and men can get urinary tract infections, but women are more susceptible.

Infections of the urinary tract can cause white, cloudy urine because pus and even red blood cells (which you might not see as red- they may just cloud up your urine) end up in your urine.  Small amounts of blood in your urine can make it look cloudy and more opaque.

Women with vaginal yeast infections may notice cloudy, white urine, however in their cases the cloudiness comes from contamination with vaginal discharge.

Men with prostate infections can experience cloudy, white urine.

Kidney Stones May Cause Cloudy, White Urine or Stinky Urine

Kidney stones (or any other urinary stones) can make your urine cloudy and white. This is due to the red blood cells you’re excreting.

Aside from murky, cloudy urine, kidney stones may cause back/groin/abdominal pain and nausea. However, kidney stones do not always cause symptoms.

Related:

UTI Infections 

Yeast Infections

Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Pee

Cloudy, white urine may be only slightly murky or it may be white. It may appear to have crystals or sediment in it.

Cloudy, white urine can also be caused by medications, vitamins or eating/drinking something that’s high in phosphates. High dosages of B vitamins and/or vitamin C are known to cause cloudy, white urine.

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Crystals in Urine

afp20050315p1153-f4We don’t often think of urine and crystals in the same sentence, but this is actually a serious medical condition that affects tens of thousands of people worldwide.

 

The name ‘crystals in urine’ is a bit of a misnomer really.  You can’t collect these things out of your toilet bowl and take then down to the jewelry shop, after all.  What this condition is really called is Cystitis, and it’s mainly caused by bacteria in your urinary tract. 

The condition is different from your normal bladder infection in that many of the symptoms are more severe.  If you’ve had a bladder infection or serious UTI infection before, you’ll probably experience some of the same symptoms with Cystitis.

 

When this harmful bacteria, or crystals, leave stay in your body instead of exiting from your urinary tract like they’re supposed to, you could be in for some unpleasantness.  And if you think it’s no big deal, that you’re tough and can handle a little pee problem, well think again.  If not treated Cystitis may worsen and even travel up the tubes which connect your bladder to your kidneys.  If that happens, you’ve got a problem.

Causes of Vesicoureteral Reflux

 

    • This condition happens quite often when other siblings have already had it;
    • Children with spina bifida are likely to get VUR;
    • Boys get it as infants because of forceful urination.  Girls will get it later due to irregularity;
    • VUR can happen in children that have other urinary tract problems or issues, such as posterior urethral valves, ureterocele, or ureter duplication.
    • If you are a Caucasian you are more likely to get VUR,

 

Symptoms of Vesicoureteral Reflux

One of the biggest symptoms is a UTI infection.  If a child has any symptoms of a bladder infection, they will have to be tested, and they will have a high chance of having VUR:

  •  Problems urinating;
  •  Urinating with increased urgency;
  •  Urine that only dribbles out;
  •  Children with continual problems wetting their pants;
  •  Swollen kidneys;
  •  Poor or slow weight gain;
  •  High blood pressure;
  •  Fevers.

 

You don’t want your child to have any later complications in life because of something like VUR, which can be treated.  One common complication that develops in children is scarring of the kidneys due to high blood pressure that often develops from VUR, whether they had it at an early ago or chose not to treat it. 

If your child only has a UTI infection, you will have a good chance of clearing it up within a few weeks using medications, but the key is going to the doctor to make sure it’s not something more serious.

 

Treatments for Vesicoureteral Reflux

When tests are performed, your doctor will determine what level of reflux your child is experiencing, and put it on a scale from 1-5, 5 being the most severe. 

 

The good news is that most children will fall into the 1-3 category ranges, which will often clear up with time.  No therapies are needed, unless the VUR was accompanied by fevers, at which point your doctor will prescribe medication.

 

If your child is in the 4-5 range, you may have to have surgery performed.  A surgeon will create a flap-valve in the ureter that will prevent urine from flowing the wrong way, from the bladder to the kidneys. 

 

This is a drastic method, but the alternative could be severe damage to the bladder, urinary tract, or kidneys later in life, ore even before they’re fully grown.

 

Where to Learn More

There are many great websites out there where you can find information on VUR as well as other conditions present with VUR, such as a bladder or urinary tract infection.

 

WebMD Article on VUR

National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC) – Info on VUR

 

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Vesicoureteral Reflux (VUR)

739bba_cd30c7c93cd714d252a559b07aa8ecc9It’s estimated that only 10% of the population has Vesicoureteral Reflux, but that number jumps up to about 17% in children.  What’s more, if they’re going to the doctor because of a UTI infection, children will have VUR 70% of the time.  With those kinds of numbers it’s important to learn about this condition.  And if you’re female, you’ll account for 85% of the reported VUR cases.

 

There are two main type of VUR, primary and secondary.  Primary VUR usually strikes a child when still in the womb, and problems with urination originate there, though this type will often disappear with age.  Secondary VUR shows up later and these are the children with reflux problems, or problems urinating.

Causes of Vesicoureteral Reflux

 

  • This condition happens quite often when other siblings have already had it;                                                                             
  • Children with spina bifida are likely to get VUR;
  • Boys get it as infants because of forceful urination.  Girls will get it later due to irregularity;
  • VUR can happen in children that have other urinary tract problems or issues, such as posterior urethral valves, ureterocele, or ureter duplication.
  • If you are a Caucasian you are more likely to get VUR.

 

Symptoms of Vesicoureteral Reflux

 

 

One of the biggest symptoms is a UTI infection.  If a child has any symptoms of a bladder infection, they will have to be tested, and they will have a high chance of having VUR:

  • Problems urinating;
  •  Urinating with increased urgency;
  •  Urine that only dribbles out;
  •  Children with continual problems wetting their pants;
  •  Swollen kidneys;
  •  Poor or slow weight gain;
  •  high blood pressure;
  •  Fevers.

 

You don’t want your child to have any later complications in life because of something like VUR, which can be treated.  One common complication that develops in children is scarring of the kidneys due to high blood pressure that often develops from VUR, whether they had it at an early ago or chose not to treat it. 

If your child only has a UTI infection, you will have a good chance of clearing it up within a few weeks using medications, but the key is going to the doctor to make sure it’s not something more serious.

 

Treatments for Vesicoureteral Reflux

When tests are performed, your doctor will determine what level of reflux your child is experiencing, and put it on a scale from 1-5, 5 being the most severe. 

 

The good news is that most children will fall into the 1-3 category ranges, which will often clear up with time.  No therapies are needed, unless the VUR was accompanied by fevers, at which point your doctor will prescribe medication.

 

If your child is in the 4-5 range, you may have to have surgery performed.  A surgeon will create a flap-valve in the ureter that will prevent urine from flowing the wrong way, from the bladder to the kidneys. 

 

This is a drastic method, but the alternative could be severe damage to the bladder, urinary tract, or kidneys later in life, ore even before they’re fully grown.

Where to Learn More

There are many great websites out there where you can find information on VUR as well as other conditions present with VUR, such as a bladder or urinary tract infection.

 

WebMD Article
http://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/tc/vesicoureteral-reflux-vur-topic-overview

 

National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC)
http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/vesicoureteralreflux/

 

 

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Diabetes

diabetes-destroyer2
Millions of Americans are getting diabetes everyday, usually through lifestyle choices, such as diet and exercise.  While Type 1 diabetes is considered a genetic disorder and is not preventable, Type 2 diabetes is preventable and shouldn’t strike anyone who is careful.

If you’re worried that you may have diabetes, perhaps because you are overweight or obese, or maybe because you have some common symptoms of diabetes, like constant thirst and the need to urinate all the time, you may want to check with your doctor.  Catching this condition early and treating it correctly will save you a lot of heartache later in life.

About Diabetes
Diabetes is caused by an inadequate amount of insulin in the blood.  The result is that higher than normal levels of glucose start to appear and then build up in.  That means that each time you eat, your body is releasing insulin into your blood from your pancreas.  If your body can’t handle this insulin, it will turn into glucose, overloading your system and causing problems. 

 

We need insulin because it allows our stomachs to turn the foods we eat into glucose, the basic sugar form of energy that our bodies need to build and repair cells.  When that glucose gets into our bloodstreams, insulin is needed to help it get into the cells.  Once safely inside our cells, glucose will give us the energy we need.

 

When you don’t have enough insulin, however, your body will have problems.  How can you get that glucose into your cells?  How can you get the energy you need? 

 

It’s no wonder that many people with diabetes often feel tired or thirsty; their bodies aren’t getting the energy they need from the foods they eat.  What’s more, extra glucose is usually stored in our liver to be used at a later time when the body needs it.  This instinctual and critical starvation response will be seriously disrupted if your body can’t make the insulin it needs.

 

 

Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

 

 

There are two main kinds of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2.

 

Type 1

 

This form of Diabetes shows up early, usually having its onset in young people under 30.  The main cause is that there’s not enough insulin in the pancreas.  These are the people you see in restaurants taking their insulin shots, which will help them break down that extra glucose.

Type 2

 

This form of Diabetes shows up late, usually having its onset in older people.  The best treatment for Type 2 Diabetes is proper diet and exercise.  After all, most people who are affected by this usually are overweight or obese, and the numbers are staggering.  In 1985 only 30 million people had Type 2 diabetes, but by 2010 the number had jumped to nearly 285 million.  Foods and sedentary lifestyles are the main culprits.

 

Symptoms of Diabetes

 

 

There are some symptoms that are common to both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes:

 

  •  Constantly thirsty;
  •  You feel the need to urinate frequently;
  •  Fatigue;
  •  Vision changes;
  • Constantly hungry;
  •  Unexplained weight loss;
  •  Cuts that are slow to heal or become infected;
  •  Itchy skin that won’t go away.

 

Symptoms of Type 1 Diabetes:

  • If you’re starting to develop Type 1 Diabetes, you’ll usually experience extreme thirst, fatigue, and weight loss.
  •  Polynuria:  This is the medical name for urinating too often or frequently, as much as 2-3 liters over a 24-hour period.

 

Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes:

  • There are fewer symptoms when it comes to Type 2 Diabetes, and many older or overweight people won’t even know they have it until other serious conditions or complications result. Still, the common symptoms listed earlier, such as constant thirst, hunger, or urination all apply.
  • That’s why regular checkups with your doctor are so important, and if you’re already overweight, think about some easy exercises or dieting options to reduce your risk, and symptoms.
  •  Many people find that their Type 2 Diabetes will disappear completely when they begin to lose weight.  But be careful, many successful people lose the weight only to let it come back.  Type 2 Diabetes can come back as a result.

 

Diabetes and Urine

 

If you’ve got either Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes, you may find that you’re experiencing some problems with your bladder or urine.  Many people will experience a UTI infection at least once in their lives, but if you’ve got diabetes, you might find that these problems are coming on sooner and occurring more often.

 

It’s simple really; diabetes damages the nerves that are needed to maintain our healthy urinary tracts and function. 

 

Problems with Diabetes and Urine

 

  • Frequent urination because of high blood sugar levels;
  •  The muscles of the sphincter work poorly;
  •  You can’t empty your bladder when you urinate;
  •  Bladder or urinary tract infections.

 

These problems will only get worse if you have high cholesterol, high blood pressure, are extremely overweight or obese, are at an advanced age, smoke, or lead an inactive lifestyle.  What’s more, when your bladder is not functioning properly because of diabetes, you get the double whammy of having your insulin intake actually making your bladder problems worse.

Treatments for Diabetes and Urine Problems

 

  • If you’ve got an overactive bladder you may be prescribed medications, urged to undergo bladder training methods, get electrical stimulation, or even undergo surgery.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
  •  If your sphincter is affected, you may be having problems controlling your urine, often experiencing leakage.  Botox has been known to help, but has not been approved officially for this use.
  •  If you’re retaining too much urine in your bladder and it never quite feels like you’re done when you finish up in the bathroom, you may be setting yourself up later in life for such conditions as kidney or bladder infections.  There are many medications that will help you.  And if you have serious problems, catheters and stents can be installed after any surgeries.
  • Too much glucose in our blood is not good, and the body tries to get rid of it by one of the best ways it has, urine.  You’ll often feel the need to pee frequently when you have diabetes, and this may also make you feel thirsty.  A viscous cycle then develops, and you might feel like you need to pack a bag and move into your bathroom.  Still, this is good as your body is trying to get rid of that glucose buildup.

 

Related:

 

Ketoacidosis

 

Cloudy Urine- What Does It Mean?

 

Top 10 Most Common Causes of Smelly Urine

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Filed under Bladder & Liver Diseases, Diabetes & Stinky Urine, Infections, Kidney, Worst Case Scenarios

Could Kidney Stones Cause Stinky Urine?

kidney-stones

Kidney or bladder stones, also known as urinary stones, can cause stinky urine. Urinary stones are more common in men, but women can also get them.

Kidney stones are known for being quite painful. Typically the pain radiates from the flank to the groin or to the genitals and inner thigh area. It tends to come and go in waves lasting about 20 to 60 minutes and is accompanied by the following symptoms:

  • Urgent need to urinate;
  • Painful urination;
  • Red blood cells in the urine, which may turn it a reddish, rusty color;
  • Pus in the urine;
  • Sweating;
  • Restlessness;
  • Nausea and/or vomiting.

Together, these symptoms are known as renal colic.

If you suspect you may have kidney stones, you should seek emergency medical care immediately. The kidney stone can be broken up using ultrasound or removed physically.  Controlling pain is also a high priority.

If you are prone to kidney stones, it’s worthwhile to look into supplements, changes in diet and any other lifestyle changes that could prevent your kidney stones from recurring.  Examples of all-natural supplements that could prevent kidney stones include:

Uriflow Natural Treatment for Kidney Stones 1 – 60 Capsule Bottle

Stone-X – 60 – Capsule

Himalaya Herbal Healthcare UriCare/Cystone, Urinary Comfort, 240 Vcaps, 840mg

Taking a supplement such as Stone-X or Uriflow could reduce or eliminate the recurrence of kidney stones, but it is not the only solution.  You can also read up on many more ways to prevent them in the book:

 

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Filed under Bladder & Liver Diseases, Kidney, Top 10 Causes of Stinky Urine